Immortalis

After Transcendence, I was ready to dive into Immortalis and see the story to its conclusion.  Not because I wanted it to be over, but because seeing all the pieces fall into place and interact in a unique way is what I like most of this kind of novel.  In this case, while I liked how everything ended, I felt like there were pieces left at the end that didn’t quite fit.

As usual, I’ll provide some details after the jump.

As I mentioned about Transcendence, Immortalis has a story about strategic army movements at its core.  It does still provide plenty of time for personal heroics however (especially from Jilsepony and Roger) as well as villainy by Aydrian and De’Unerro.  This, and the much more personal nature of Jilsepony’s fight, gives the book more personal feel than it otherwise would have, and helps keep it together for me.

On the other hand, there were a number of things that made this book in particular feel very disjointed.  In particular, there are events that seem to not have consequences or even mention until far later than I felt like they should (if they get a mention at all).  This made many of the grander subplots hard to follow, and made the book feel much more shallow than I think it could have been.

In truth, though, I like the resolution to Immortalis.  While the plot wasn’t much my thing, the resolution of that plot felt good.  The quest of a mother to redeem her son is something that really resonates with me, where the wars really didn’t.  And, I feel like this ending is a nice counterpoint to the ending of The Demon Apostle both books were about someone possessed by the demon dactyl, and both were about that moment of redemption at the end, but here, the goal was that redemption, where in The Demon Apostle that was just a consequence.

Finally…  …I’m a sucker for interesting poetry, and I really like the poem, Immortalis.

While I can’t necessary give this book a great rating – it had a number of flaws, and it didn’t really work for me, I do think that the end was worth it.  If you’ve already started reading the Demonwars trilogy, finish it out – it’s the shortest of the Second Demonwars Trilogy and worth the closure.

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